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Thanksgiving Dog Tips



Stuff Your Turkey, Not Your Dog

You may want to give your dog a big fat bowl of turkey, mashed potatoes, and whatever else you think she might enjoy. But don't do it. Overindulging in fatty foods can lead to an upset stomach, diarrhea, or a life-threatening condition called pancreatitis. A few strips of turkey is fine, but don't overdo it, no matter how she may plead with her "I'm STARVING" eyes. Keep in mind that turkey skin can wreak havoc with a dog's digestive system, so make sure she gets skinless, boneless turkey.  Keep pets away from corn on the cob, which can cause intestinal obstructions and surgery that could cost up to $3,000. Savory sides such as stuffing often contain onions, which are toxic to red blood cells in cats and dogs, or raisins and grapes, which are harmful to a dogís kidneys.

The butter and fat in mashed potatoes or candied yams may inflame your petís pancreas.

Pancreatitis is an inflammation of the pancreas and can be lethal for your dog. Mini Schnauzers are particularly predisposed to pancreatitis.

Symptoms of pancreatitis include loss of appetite, lethargy, vomiting, abdominal pain, diarrhea and fever. If you suspect your dog has helped himself to a turkey dinner and is showing any of these symptoms, then I suggest you take him to your vet as soon as you can.

Here's a great way to keep your dog busy and happy during your meal. Put a bit of your dog's regular food in a Kong, and then stuff a little boneless turkey, sweet potatoes, gravy - just a tad, mind you - in the Kong. It's not much food, but it will keep him occupied for a long time.

Here are some Tips for a Turkey Safe Thanksgiving:
  1. Don't leave uncooked turkey unattended on the kitchen counter - the smell is too tempting for your dog. Raw meat can contain harmful bacteria, and turkey bones could either choke your dog or break/splinter whilst he's eating them. Broken bones can tear, or get stuck in, any part of your dog's gastrointestinal tract as they work their way through his system;
  2. Once you've cooked your turkey, and before you sit down to eat, clear away all the wrappings such as tin foil, string and meat skewers - they are all potential hazards for your dog;
  3. If you put the wrappings in the bin, make sure the lid is on firmly; we have used bricks on the bin lid in the past to keep out persistent foragers!
  4. Prepare a turkey treat for your dog that he can eat while you are having your meal - a kong stuffed with white turkey meat and dried kibble will keep him busy. If your dog's in the room with you, you know he's not up to turkey mischief in the kitchen. However, once he finished his treat, don't give in to any begging from him; and
  5. A tired dog is a good dog. Try and give you dog a good energetic walk in the morning, something that's mentally and physically stimulating. That way he'll be more inclined to sleep or at least lie quietly while you are preparing and eating your turkey roast - particularly if you give him his kong to keep him busy!
  6. Sage and some other herbs have essential oils that can cause tummy upset and central nervous system depression if a dog eats them in large quantities.
  7. Onions are toxic to dogs. They can lead to a dangerous form of anemia that may not be detected for days. Make sure your dog stays away from the pearly whites, and yellows, and reds.
  8. Some dogs seem to enjoy alcoholic drinks. Walk away from your drink that's set on the coffee table, and Lulu may get lit. Dogs and booze are a bad mix. Your dog may not do anything embarrassing she'll regret in the morning, but she could become disoriented and quite ill. Too much alcohol can even lead to a coma, and death. Watch where you - and others - put their drinks, especially if you have a curious pup.
***********

TURKEY BAKE TEMPER
from PupSnacks by Stephanie Mehanna & Robert S Goldstein, V.M.D.

So Simple to prepare, yet so impressive when cut into bite-sized mini bakes

Makes 10-12 Portions, Cooking Time 40-45 Minutes, Prep Time 10 Minutes

1 lb. Minced Turkey
5 oz. Dried Breadcrumbs, made for wheat- and gluten
free bread
1 egg, beaten
1 Sweet Potato, Cooked & Mashed
5 oz. Carrots, thinly sliced
3 1/2 oz. Green beans, thinly sliced
1 Tbsp. Chopped Sage
3 Tbsp. Homemade Chicken Stock or Water
1 Tbsp. Brewer's Yeast

Mix all the ingredients in a large mixing bowl until well combined. Transfer the mixture to a deep 10 x 12 inch ovenproof dish and level out with the back of a spoon. Bake in a preheated oven, 350 degrees for 40 -45 minutes until firm. Remove from the oven and leave to cool.

Cut the Turkey Bake into 2 inch squares and store for up to 5 days in an airtight container in the refrigerator. Serve cool or cool as you dog cannot digest hot food and it can cause damage to the lining of this stomach.


MAGNIFICENT MUFFINS
from PupSnacks by Stephanie Mehanna & Robert S Goldstein, V.M.D.

Pumpkin is low in fat and high in fiber, it provides a good source of potassium and beta-carotene. It helps to kick-start the immune system and its antioxidant properties may help prevent cancer and other diseases.

Makes 15 - 18

Prep Time: 15 Minutes

Cooking Time: 20 - 25 Minutes

10 oz Wheat and Gluten free flour
1 tsp. Baking Powder
1 tsp. Baking Soda
2 TBSP. Carob Powder
1/2 tsp. Ground Cinnamon

3 1/2 oz Pumpkin, Cooked and Mashed (Not Pie Filling)
1 TBSP Honey
1 Egg, beaten
3 TBSP Olive Oil, Plus extra for greasing
7 fl oz. Cold Water
Mix all the dry ingredients with the pumpkin and the honey in a large mixing bowl. Stir in the egg and the olive oil, then add the measured water, a little at a time, until you have a runny batter. Grease a nonstick muffin or bun tray with olive oil. Fill the muffin cups with the batter, leaving a little room at the top for the mixture to expand.

Bake in a preheated oven, 350 degrees for 20 - 25 minutes or until golden brown. Test if the muffins are ready by inserting a toothpick or skewer. If it comes out clean, they are ready. Transfer to a wire rack and leave to cool. Store the muffins in an airtight container in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.


THANKSGIVING TURKEY GOBBLERS
Three Dog Bakery Cookbook

Your Dog will be Giving Thanks Indeed when he Gobbles down a few of these.

24 Tempting Tantalizing Turkey Treats

Preheat oven to 375 degrees



1 cup Ground Turkey
2 cups White Flour
1 cup Cornmeal
1 Egg
3 TBSP. Vegetable Oil
3/4 cup Water
2 tsp. Tarragon

In a frying pan, cook ground turkey, crumble into small pieces and set aside on a paper towel. Combine flour and cornmeal in a large bowl, then in a separate bowl, beat egg, oil and water, then add tarragon. Add dry ingredients to wet and mix well. Fold in ground turkey and mix again. Turn dough out on a lightly floured surface and knead until thoroughly mixed together. Roll out dough to 1/2 inch thick and cut out shapes. (Turkey cookie cutters make cute treats). Place on a greased baking sheet and bake for 15 minutes or until firm. Cool and serve. Keep any leftovers in a sealed container in the refrigerator.


Human Foods That Poison Pets

Avocado: All parts are toxic to dogs
Chocolate: Contains Theobromine, a cardiac stimulant which can be fatal to dogs
Fruit Pits and Seeds: Most contain cyanide
Garlic: Contains Thiosulphate, though a small amount, so a lot would have to be ingested to be toxic.
Grapes: Affects a dog's kidneys
Macadamia Nuts: Affects the nervous system
Mushrooms: Affect the nervous system, kidneys and heart
Nutmeg: Can cause seizures and central nervous system damage
Onions: Contains same toxin as garlic, though in much larger amounts
Raisins: Same as grapes
Sugar-Free Foods: These contain Xylitol, which can cause liver failure in dogs
Tomatoes, Potatoes and Rhubarb: Parts of these contain oxalates, which can be toxic to dogs

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